Spanish mortgages – Latest news.

 

Following our previous article about mortgages in Spain.

The CJEU resolution (21th of December 2016) allows consumers to claim their money back retrospectively from Spanish Banks

 

As we explained in our previous article, The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) was recently asked to decide about an important case for Spanish consumers as well as for Spanish Banks. The final decision has now been issued and this is good news for those individuals who got a Spanish mortgage but not for the banks.

Some of you will recall that some Spanish mortgages signed in the last 15 years contained a clause that Spanish Courts recently declared null and void because of the “lack of transparency” and “the failure to inform customers adequately” when they signed the mortgage deed. These clauses are known as a “cláusula suelo” which means that they are subject to a minimum monthly payment even if the interest rate, which usually has a variable rate linked to the Euribor, is negative.

If you bought a Property in Spain during the property bubble (2000 to 2008) you were probably paying the appropriate interest. However, the interest rates were quite low after the recession and those who had a “clausula suelo” on their mortgages have been paying an unfair and excessive interest on their mortgages which they can probably claim back.

The consumer’s action group (Adicae) started in 2013, on behalf of 15.000 mortgage holders, a claim against banks claiming for the nullity of the “cláusulas suelo”, after these had been declared “abusives” by the Spanish Supreme Court but with a retrospectivity to May 2013. This was clearly unfair. If a clause in a mortgage was considered abusive then the consumer’s right to claim should not be capped to May 2013. It should be retrospective to the date in which the mortgage deed was signed.

The said action group went to Luxembourg asking for the backdating to the date that the mortgage was signed and the CJEU has today decided that Spanish Banks have the obligation to refund unlawful interest from the very beginning: backdated to the date the mortgage was signed (instead of May 2013).

This means that Spanish banks have to pay consumers around €4.000.000. Goldman Sachs says that BBVA will be the Spanish Bank with a higher debt in front of consumers with €1.815.000.000; CaixaBank (La Caixa) with €750.000.000; following them: Banco Popular and Bankia with €160.000.000. These are the main banks but there are around 40 more banks involved.

Obviously, there are some exceptions depending on the mortgage holder’s profiles or depending on the specific circumstances of each case, but what is clear is that if you or your clients signed a mortgage in Spain during the property bubble years you or them could have the right to claim some money back.

In the following months Spanish Banks will probably try to sign transactional agreements with consumers. We strongly recommend to contact a Spanish Lawyer for advice to 1) analyse your mortgage in detail and inform you if contains a “cláusula suelo” and 2) see if you have the right to ask for a refund when that Decision takes place and last but not least 3) to deal with your Bank to ask for the refund or to negotiate with it.

 

 

Claudia Font & Antonio Guillen

Spanish lawyers at gunnercookellp

1 Cornhill London EC3V 3ND 53 King Street Manchester M2 4LQ

 

Spanish Powers of Attorney signed in the UK

image-for-poaA new Spanish case Decision by the Director General of Notaries and Registrars in Spain (DGRN) has been issued on the 14th of September 2016 affecting Spanish Powers of Attorney signed abroad and therefore also those signed in the United Kingdom.

The said decision of the DGNR rejected the registration in Spain of a purchase transaction where a Spanish Power of Attorney signed before an English Notary Public had been granted. The reason for rejecting the registration of the document was that the Land Registrar considered the powers and faculties of the English Notary Public who notarised the Power of Attorney (POA) not sufficiently proved.

Under the aforementioned Decision, a foreign POA should have the same structure than the Spanish public documents. This means that the document should be signed by an authorized person with capacity to give faith and certify the identity of the donor/grantor and his/her capacity.

 

This Decision stated that the foreign POA should also mention that it will be legalized according to the relevant International rules. In the case of a POA signed in the UK, this means the legalisation of the document with the apostille of the Hague Convention.

 

The key point is to ensure on the document that the UK Notary public is giving sufficient warranties to the relevant Spanish authorities as to the capacity of the donor/grantor. From now on, a Spanish POA where the UK Notary Public is restricted to certifying the identity of a person will not be sufficient. A Judgment on capacity will also be required.

 

We are of the opinion, that the said decision cannot be extrapolated to all cases. The power of attorney that created this “storm” of doubts was a power of attorney solely drafted in Spanish and the Notary Public in question limited his involvement to adding a certificate to the power of attorney which lacked any mention to capacity. We therefore think, and hope, that Spanish Notaries and Land Registrars will reconsider their position with regards to the powers of attorney executed in the UK and will soon start to recognise these again. However, there could be the odd exception where a Spanish Notary or Land Registrar will turn down a perfectly valid power of attorney executed in the UK. To avoid these kind of situations, some carefully attention needs to be put into the drafting of the power of attorney to ensure that the document has a higher chance of being accepted in Spain.

Do not hesitate to contact gunnercooke’s Spanish desk if you require further information or help with the signing and execution of a Spanish Power of Attorney in the UK.

A quick guide on buying property in Spain for UK solicitors

Beach huts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you have a client looking to buy property in Spain?

How can you help him/her from the UK?

 It is quite likely that you will have one or two clients looking for a property in Spain. The uncertainty of Brexit and the temporary weakness of the Sterling pound has not stop British buyers from their dream of buying a home in Sunny Spain. It is true that they are not buying as much as they did before the recession but they are still buying second homes and looking for a place to retire or a place to spend family holidays.

Very often, clients will contact their trusted advisors to see if they can give them some guidance or recommend a lawyer able to deal with the purchase of the property in Spain. Obviously, you cannot be expected to be versed on Spanish law and the normal thing is to recommend the client to look for a Spanish lawyer or to recommend one, if you have come across a firm in the past and you were happy with the service provided. Having said that, knowledge is never a burden and therefore see below a few tips on what should and what should not be done when buying property in Spain which will prove of help if you are approached by one of your clients asking for advice:

1) Help your client to make an accurate budget.

Apart from the price of the property your client should consider other costs involved in the transaction:

– Taxes, Notary and Land Registry: Approximately 10%-12%.

– Spanish Lawyer fees*

– Surveyor**

* althoughnot mandatory (because the Spanish Notary usually carries out the main checks on the title and charges), we would always recommend instructing a Spanish lawyer who can collaborate with you when your client is buying in Spain. He will carry on a full due diligence on the property and draft the necessary contract. The Notary Public will not do the above.

** we would recommend to have one when your client is buying a resale property in order to be 100% sure about what yourclient is going to buy.

2) Inform your client that he/she should save a 30%-40% deposit plus 10%-12% for the Notary, taxes and Land Registry fees.

Nowadays, most of Spanish banks are not offering mortgages which exceed 70% of the appraised value of the property. Your client will need to ensure that he/she has enough deposit to complete on the purchase, usually around 30%-40%.

3) Your client should have a clear idea of what he is planning to buy before committing to a purchase

Spain has different regions with big differences between them in terms of weather, lifestyle, tourism, etc and most importantly, in terms of price. We would recommend your clients to visit the place in winter so they can get an idea of the way of life outside the tourist season.

Once they decide where they want to buy, the second step is to consider the different types of properties they can buy, i.e. brand new, old property, off-plan property, urban or rustic land, and obtain legal advice to ensure they are fully advised on all aspects of being the ownerof a property in Spain.

4) Encourage your client to check different options of mortgages.

Make sure your client fully understands the conditions of the mortgage offer. We would recommend to have the draft mortgage deed reviewed by a Spanish lawyer in order to ensure that it does not contain abusive clauses. In our recent article about Spanish mortgages we talked about some abusive clauses that some Spanish lenders have been including in their mortgages in recent years and that should be avoided when getting a Spanish mortgage.

Look for the mortgage which is most appropriate for your client´s income and financials. There is a range of mortgages on offer and yourclient should pay special attention to the interest rate, repayment period, fees for setting up the mortgage as well as early repayment and cancellation fees.

 5) Advise your client to reserve the property and sign a purchase agreement or “contrato de arras”.

If yourclient finally finds “the” property, he/she will have to reserve it while you and your Spanish lawyer will be collaborating and dealing with all the checks that the transaction requires to ensure that they are buying safely. Your client will need to pay a reservation fee of around 3000 Euro which will take the property out of the market. Then, once all the checks have been done, and the documentation has been reviewed, he/she will be asked to pay a deposit of around 10% with the signing of the purchase agreement (contrato de arras) and the rest will be due on completion.

Signing an “arras” contract means that both parties have the right to withdraw:

If your client decides not to proceed with the transaction he/she will lose the deposit, but if it is the seller who withdraws, or if the property has been misrepresented, yourclient will be entitled to claim double of the deposit: his 10% plus another 10% compensation.

6) Consider engaging a surveyor.

Your client may consider that the property needs to be surveyed by a professional with appropriate experience and qualifications. That is very sensible thing to do, but your client will find that some Spanish estate agents will discourage this. If that is the case, the client needs to follow his/her own instincts and still instruct his/her own surveyor.

7) Check the annual expenses of owning a property in Spain.

Be certain of the likely annual expenses your client will incur, including service charges, property tax (IBI), non-residents income tax, wealth tax if applicable, electricity, water, gas, etc.

8) Instruct an independent Spanish lawyer to collaborate with you.

All of the above-mentioned advice can became a terrible bureaucratic fight if yourclient does not engage the expertise and help of an independent Spanish lawyer.

A Spanish lawyer will guide you or your client through the entire process, avoiding extra costs and, what is more important, ensuring that the property your client is going to buy has all it needs to be transferred into his/her name: no charges, no development plans affecting it, etc.

You can instruct a Spanish Lawyer based in Spain or in the UK. Please note that there are several UK law firms with an in house Spanish lawyer able to provide legal advice without your client having to go to Spain.

 9) Warn your client not to declare a lower value than the actual purchase price.

In the past it was quite common to declare a low value for the property in order to minimize the transfer tax payable by the buyer and the CGT payable by the seller. Nowadays, the Spanish treasury will prosecute anyone who declares a price lower than the one effectively paid. The wrongdoer will be fined and additional interest will be applied. On the other hand, when your client decides to sell the property, he/she will be liable to pay Spanish capital gains tax on any profit made and he/she will be liable for CGT on a much larger (but not real) profit.

 10) Recommend your client to make a Spanish Will.

We would recommend your clients to sign a Spanish Will when acquiring a property in Spain. This in order to avoid potential problems in the future for their relatives and beneficiaries. It is not compulsory but in our own experience, really advisable.

Claudia Font & Antonio Guillen

Spanish Desk

Gunnercooke LLP

www.gunnercooke.com

 

London   Manchester

Do´s and don´t when buying property in Spain

dos-and-donts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do’s & don’ts when buying in Spain.

DO’S.

  • Make your budget.

Apart from the price of the property you should consider other costs related to the transaction such as follows:

  • Taxes, Notary and Land Registry: You should consider 10%-12%.
  • Spanish Lawyer fees*
  • Surveyor** although it is not mandatory to ask for a survey, we would recommend to have one in order to be 100% sure about what you are buying.
  • Real Estate Agency fees: if you are using a real estate agency for the search they will charge a percentage of the price, depending on the region although the norm is that this is paid by the seller.
  • * although it is not mandatory to instruct a lawyer when buying in Spain, because the Notary carry out the main checks (charges etc) we strongly recommend you to instruct one to ensure that your interests and investment are properly protected.
  • Ensure you have 30% for the mortgage deposit plus 10% for the Notary, taxes and Land Registry fees.

Nowadays, most of the banks are not offering mortgages which exceed 70% of the price, so you will need to ensure you are able to pay a deposit of 30%, as well as paying the costs.

  • Decide what and where you want to buy.

Spain has different regions with big differences between them in terms of weather, lifestyle, tourism, etc and most importantly, in terms of price. We would recommend that you visit in winter so that you can get an idea of the way of life outside tourist season.

Once you decide where you are going to buy, you should consider the different types of properties you can buy, i.e. brand new, old property, off-plan property, urban or rustic land, and obtain legal advice to ensure you are fully advised on all aspects of being a new owner.

  • Check different options of mortgages.

Make sure you fully understand the mortgage agreement you are going to sign. We would recommend to ask for the mortgage deed to be reviewed by a lawyer in order to ensure it does not contains abusive clauses.

Look for the mortgage which is most appropriate for your capabilities and needs. There are a range of mortgages on offer and you should pay special attention to the interest rate and repayment period, fees for setting up the mortgage as well as early repayment and cancellation fees.

  • Reserve the property and sign a “contrato de arras”.

If you find “the” property, you will have to reserve it while your lawyers are dealing with all the checks that the transaction needs to ensure that you are buying safely. You will need to pay a reservation fee of around 3000 Euro which will take the property out of the market. Then, once your lawyer is happy with the legal documentation, you will be asked to pay a deposit of around 10% with the signing of the purchase agreement (contrato de arras) and the rest will be due on completion.

Signing an “arras” contract means that both parties have the right to withdraw:

If you decide not to proceed with the transaction you will lose the deposit, but if it is the seller who withdraws, or if the property has been misrepresented, you will be entitled to claim for double of the deposit.

  • Consider engaging a surveyor.

You may consider that the property needs to be surveyed by a professional with appropriate experience and qualifications. That is very sensible, but you will find that some Spanish estate agents will discourage this.

  • Find out about the annual expenses of owning a property in Spain.

Be certain of the likely annual expenses you will incur, including service charges, property tax (IBI), non-residents income tax, wealth tax if applicable, electricity, water, gas, etc.

  • Hire a Spanish lawyer.

All of the above-mentioned advice can became a terrible bureaucratic fight if you do not engage the expertise and help of an independent Spanish lawyer.

A Spanish lawyer will guide you through the entire process, avoiding extra costs and which is more important, ensuring that the property you are going to buy, has all it needs to be transferred (no charges), no development plans affecting it, etc.

You can use a Spanish Lawyer based in Spain or in the UK. Please note that there are several UK law firms with an in house Spanish lawyer able to provide legal advice without you having to go to Spain.

  • Make a Spanish Will.

We would recommend to sign a Spanish Will when acquiring a property in Spain.

DON’TS.

  • Do not be forced by the bank to get their insurance or other bank products.
  • Do not sign any document if you do not understand them.
  • Do not pay more than what was agreed.
  • Do not sign any document without a Spanish lawyer.
  • Do not buy a property without taking legal advice.
  • Do not pay large amounts of money to developers who do not offer you the security of a Bank Guarantee for these payments.
  • Do not be tempted to declare a lower property value than the actual purchase price.

In the past it was quite common to declare a low value for the property in order to minimize the transfer tax. Nowadays, the Spanish treasury will prosecute anyone who declares a lower price. The wrongdoer will be punished and additional interest will be applied. On the other hand, when you decide to sell this property, you will be liable for Spanish capital gains tax on any profit made and, you will be liable for tax on a much larger profit when you sell later. The safest way is to ask at the payment office of the nearest tax agency and they will give you the exact value of a particular property.

By Claudia Font & Antonio Guillen

Tell me more about Gunnercooke!

http://http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/businessclub/business-club-video/legal-sector-videos/12213217/gunnercooke.html

What is Gunnercooke? Very often I get asked this question by clients and contacts. They have heard that we are a diffent law firm to the standard, traditional and rigid law firms. However they do not know what makes the difference between us and other law firms.

See above an interesting video made by The Telegraph on our law firm Gunnercooke LLP which explains the ethos of the firm. It summarises quite well who we are, what we do and what we are aiming to achieve. You will note that our priority is client service. We believe that by focusing on clients, the rest (the financials, the success, the reputation) will follow eventually.

Interestingly, Gunnercooke LLP celebrated its annual symposium last week in Oxford where around 100 plus lawyers gathered to talk about the trajectory of the firm and listened to excellent speakers who talked about various subjects from business development to client quality service and even how to be happy! It was a good opportunity for lawyers from different departments to talk about what they are doing and the future of the legal profession.

oxford-college

It was also positive for us, the Spanish lawyers at Gunnercooke, to discuss burning subjects of today with other lawyers such as Brexit, the economy and how this could affect our clients and their interest in Spain.

A wonderful and enriching experience that we are eager to repeat next year. Specially in such a historic (and magical!) place as the Oxford College!!

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Guillén and Claudia Font, Spanish lawyers at Gunnercooke LLP, at the annual Gala at the Oxford College.

People walk over Westminster Bridge wrapped in Union flags, towards the Queen Elizabeth Tower (Big Ben) and The Houses of Parliament in central London on June 26, 2016. Britain's opposition Labour party plunged into turmoil Sunday and the prospect of Scottish independence drew closer, ahead of a showdown with EU leaders over the country's seismic vote to leave the bloc. Two days after Prime Minister David Cameron resigned over his failure to keep Britain in the European Union, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn faced a revolt by his lawmakers who called for him, too, to quit. / AFP / Odd ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

BREXIT AND SPAIN: TWO MONTHS LATER

WHAT WOULD AN EVENTUAL BREXIT MEAN FOR THOSE BRITISH THAT WANT TO BUY PROPERTY IN SPAIN?

How would it affect British people who own properties in Spain? And those who are in the process of buying them?

It is too early to know what is going to happen but the more immediate effect is the depreciation of the sterling pound. If you already own property in Spain then no need to panic and as the old saying states: Keep calm and carry on!

If you are planning to buy a property in Spain or have fallen in love with a specific villa and do not want to wait until there is more certainty about the future of the UK in the European Union, you can compensate the depreciation of the sterling pound with some measures. Below you will see some examples:

  1. You could offer to pay the purchase price in Sterling pound. This may prove interesting for the seller, especially if it is a British seller (something not that unusual these days). By doing this you will not be exposed to the depreciation of the pound and you will not pay a higher price for the property in Spain.
  2. If the above is not possible, you should then use a foreign currency broker who will be able to buy the Euro for a more favourable rate than the one offered by your High Street bank. Unless you are a High Net Worth Individual who has the privilege of having a bank account with a private bank, in which case you may get a similar rate to the one offered by a Foreign Currency broker.
  3. Finally, the economy in Spain and in the UK are not that stable. Use this point to negotiate a reduction in the price. In spite of an increase in property demand in certain areas of Spain, the property market is still far from recovered and the current economic and political uncertainty could help to get a substantial reduction in the price that could compensate the money that you may lose with the depreciation of the sterling pound.

These are just a few recommendations. Obviously, don´t forget to instruct an independent lawyer for your purchase. Whether is Antonio Guillen and Claudia Font at Gunnercooke LLP (or another lawyer) do not make the mistake of using a lawyer recommended by an estate agent or the seller because that could lead to a conflict of interest and eventually to a problem.

 

 

3rd Edition of Spanish Festival

FESTEJAR 2016

Festejar 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left to right: Virginia Moreno, Claudia Font, Jesus Torre, Mariluz Simal, Antonio Guillén and Angel Miguelez.

The Spanish Desk from Gunnercooke attended last night the opening of the FESTEJAR festival in Manchester. It is the third edition of a Spanish festival in which, for four days (from the 1st the the 4th of September), visitors will be able to enjoy live music, food and drinks with the greatest “Iberian” atmosphere.

The festival brands itself as one with a “Spanish soul with a Manchester heart”, and we could not agree more.

As Antonio Guillen, Honorary Consul for Spain in Manchester, stated, he “really enjoyed the two previous editions of the festival, where Spanish food, music and drinks took over Albert’s square in a very civilised, tolerant and vibrant event”.

The festival gives us all the opportunity to check the good relations that exist between British and Spanish people, in such an international city as Manchester.

Giving the atmosphere that surrounded the opening last night, there is no doubt that the third edition is going to be probably even better than the two previous ones.

If possible, clear your schedule for this weekend and join us at FESTEJAR!

How to apply for British citizenship

British citizenship

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Article is in Spanish because it is mainly for those Spanish nationals who are considering applying for British citizenship. Should you require information in English please contact us on Antonio.guillen@gunnercooke.com

A la vista de varias consultas hechas recientemente sobre la posibilidad de pedir la ciudadanía británica, y de los nuevos acontecimientos políticos, dejo aquí 4 pinceladas, por si os son de interés.

Los españoles que llevan 5 años residiendo en Reino Unido (o 3 si están casados con un nacional británico) pueden pedir el certificado de residencia británico y al cabo de 12 meses aplicar para la ciudadanía. Si lleváis 6 años, lo podéis hacer al mismo tiempo.

Son una serie de trámites para lo que NO es necesario abogado, si bien muchos de vosotros preferís contratar a alguien pues los trámites, aunque no muy complicados, siempre son un tanto pesados.

Si lo queréis pedir vosotros directamente, encontraréis toda la información en este link https://www.gov.uk/becoming-a-british-citizen/check-if-you-can-apply.

Los costes para pedirlo (aún haciéndolo directamente vosotros) son aproximadamente los siguientes:

Certificación de residencia permanente en el Home Office: actualmente unos £65.

Costes para la solicitud de la ciudadanía, al Gobierno Británico: £1,236.

Registro de datos biométricos: actualmente unos £19.20.

En caso de que queráis hacerlo a través de abogado, desde el Spanish Desk en gunnercooke estaremos encantados de haceros un presupuesto.

Necesitaremos en primer lugar pediros una serie de datos, a parte de los personales de contacto, tales como fecha de entrada, estancias fuera del país, si tenéis algún certificado que acredite vuestro nivel de inglés, entre otros.

Estaremos encantados de asistiros en estos trámites.

Espero que os sea útil este post.

Antonio Guillén & Claudia Font

Gunnercooke LLP

www.gunnercooke.com

From Mexico to Manchester

http://https://blog.uchceu.es/derecho/de-mexico-a-manchester-con-parada-en-madrid-y-moncada-la-experiencia-internacional-de-beatriz-huitron/

I would like to thank Beatriz Huitron for the post placed in the blog of the Spanish University CEU in Valencia detailing her work experiences in the Spanish department of Gunnercooke LLP.

Best wishes to Beatriz and all the best in her future endeavours as a lawyer wherever she ends up landing as the world will be full of opportunities for a Mexican national with experience in Mexico, Spain and the UK.

Saludos!

See original post below.

De México a Manchester con parada en Madrid y Moncada: la experiencia internacional de Beatriz Huitrón

beatriz-huitron-uch-ceu

Beatriz Huitrón, alumna de Derecho y del Título Especialista en Derecho Internacional y Europeo de la CEU-UCH, en Manchester

“Mi nombre es Beatriz Huitrón, de nacionalidad mexicana y alumna de tercer año del grado en Derecho y Título de Especialista en Derecho Internacional y Europeo.

Tras un Erasmus que realicé el año pasado en Madrid, por parte de mi anterior Universidad “Tecnológico de Monterrey Campus Santa Fe”, mi vida profesional y personal cambió por completo. En consecuencia, tomé la decisión de concluir mis estudios en la Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera, España.

Elegí el CEU de Valencia porque me parece que es una pequeña ciudad con mucha calidad de vida y tras venir de una ciudad (Ciudad de México) con más de 5 millones de habitantes, hoy me es grato poder estar aquí.

Durante mi estancia de estudios en Madrid realice tres meses de prácticas profesionales en la Embajada de México. Estuve laborando en el área de visados de la Sección Consular. La sección consular es el área administrativa que ofrece un Estado en el exterior, con el objetivo de proteger los intereses del Estado y sus nacionales, así como prestar ayuda a estos. Mi labor, en el área de visados, era entrevistar a extranjeros que querían viajar a México por motivos de negocios, estudios, trabajo, etc. Una vez que eran entrevistadas esas personas tenían que aportar la documentación requerida para que posteriormente se verificara si se cumplía o no con la documentación correspondiente en base a la Ley de Migración Mexicana. Fueron tres meses con mucho enriquecimiento profesional, sin duda aprendí muchísimo. También es importante mencionar, que al inicio de la carrera en Derecho en México, estuve de practicante en la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, gracias a la experiencia en la dependencia fue el motivo por el cual decidí aplicar para unas prácticas en el exterior.

Madrid fue mi primer destino Erasmus, pero no mi primera experiencia internacional. En el 2014 tuve la oportunidad de vivir tres meses en Nueva York, EE.UU., con el objetivo de mejor la lengua inglesa.

Mi última estancia en el extranjero como becaria fue en febrero del presente año en un despacho jurídico en Inglaterra. Gunnercooke es un despacho con sede en Londres y Manchester. Yo tuve la oportunidad de laborar por tres meses en el despacho de Manchester. Las prácticas se desarrollaron en el área civil y consular y trabajaba como asistente del Cónsul Honorario de España en Manchester, Antonio Guillén. Durante este periodo, sin duda, pude aplicar todo lo que he hecho durante mi trayectoria profesional, además de varios conocimientos jurídicos civiles que había aprendido en el curso anterior de la carrera. Los casos que se nos presentaban día con día eran más sobre herencias, compraventas y ventas en España. De esta manera, tanto apliqué como aprendí terminología jurídica civil en inglés y español. Tras la experiencia me pude percatar de lo importante que es hablar inglés. Ahora lo valoro más que nunca y espero en algún futuro poder regresar a Inglaterra, sin duda, fue una excelente oportunidad profesional y personal en mi vida.

Beatriz Huitrón junto a Antonio Guillén, abogado inglés y español y Cónsul Honorario de España en Manchester

Beatriz Huitrón junto a Antonio Guillén, abogado inglés y español y Cónsul Honorario de España en Manchester

Ahora que estoy a un año de concluir un ciclo en mi vida profesional, tengo claro que me encantaría dedicarme al ámbito internacional o financiero. Desde un principio y debido a que tengo conocidos que se encuentran laborando en el área del Derecho Internacional Público, tuve claro que quería conocer más sobre ese ámbito y así es como lo he venido haciendo.

Uno de mis planes a medio plazo y que tengo muchas que suceda es realizar un voluntariado en la India o Tailandia, en apoyo a mujeres en riesgo de exclusión. Me considero una persona que le encanta ayudar a los demás y sería una gran satisfacción para mí poder hacer algo por alguien.

Posteriormente, estaré abierta a cualquier oportunidad que se me presente en la vida, sin embargo, el día que regrese a mi país será para dar lo mejor de todo lo que he aprendido en mía experiencias y de esta manera contribuir para la mejora y crecimiento de mi país.”

¡Muchas gracias por compartir con nosotros tu experiencia, Beatriz! Te deseamos lo mejor en el futuro.

 

Spanish theme restaurant Tapeo opens in Manchester

Tapeo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Spanish desk from Gunnercooke LLP attended last night the soft opening of Tapeo Restaurant in Manchester.

Tapeo is the latest Spanish Restaurant to be opened in the busiest area of Manchester City Centre. Fully owned by Spanish owners and managed by couple Nacho Garcia and Natalia Esquerdo, the restaurant has a very high chance of becoming the new place to go for Spanish food in Manchester.

From a legal and business point of view, it is very inspiring to see Spanish theme businesses opening in the City Centre. Tapeo follows the opening of recent Spanish theme restaurants such as La Bandera, Iberica, Lunya and El Gato Negro. Having such a wide variety of Spanish food in town (and with the recent sunnier weather) who longer needs to go to Spain for authentic Spanish food?

See below press release from Manchester Evening News.

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/whats-on/food-drink-news/tapeo-manchester-spanish-restaurant-deansgate-11320977